ALL ABOUT SUNBURN – AVOID AT ALL COSTS – A LOT OF INFORMATION


Information on why you should avoid sunburn at all costs from WebMD:

You lie out in the sun hoping to get a golden tan, but instead walk away from your lounge chair with a sunburn looking like a lobster that's been left in the pot too long.

Despite health warnings about sun damage, many of us still subject our skin to the sun's burning rays.

More than one-third of adults and nearly 70% of children admit they've gotten sunburned within the past year, according to the CDC.

Here's what you need to know about how to keep your skin safe and where to find sunburn relief if you do linger on your lounger too long.

sunburnWhat Causes Sunburn

You already know the simple explanation behind sunburn. When your skin is exposed to the sun for a period of time, eventually it burns, turning red and irritated.

Under the skin, things get a little more complicated. The sun gives off three wavelengths of ultraviolet light:

  • UVA
  • UVB
  • UVC

UVC light doesn't reach the Earth's surface. The other two types of ultraviolet light not only reach your beach towel, but they penetrate your skin. Skin damage is caused by both UVA and UVB rays.

Sunburn is the most obvious sign that you've been sitting outside for too long. But sun damage isn't always visible. Under the surface, ultraviolet light can alter your DNA, prematurely aging your skin. Over time, DNA damage can contribute to skin cancers, including deadly melanoma.

How soon a sunburn begins depends on:

  • Your skin type
  • The sun's intensity
  • How long you're exposed to the sun

A blonde-haired, blue-eyed woman sunbathing in Rio de Janeiro will redden far sooner than an olive-complexioned woman sitting out on a sunny day in New York City.

Signs of Sunburn

When you get a sunburn, your skin turns red and hurts. If the burn is severe, you can develop swelling and sunburn blisters. You may even feel like you have the flu — feverish, with chills, nauseaheadache, and weakness.

A few days later, your skin will start peeling and itching as your body tries to rid itself of sun-damaged cells.

FROM YOUR FRIENDS AT TANTRA HEALH & BEAUTY

If you're going to be in the sun, whether working, playing, sunbathing or just getting some exersize, you need protection from UV rays. If your body is tan it helps in protecting the lower dermis. MT2 can help you develop a tan from the lower dermis outward. Even after you are tanned you should always wear a very high quality sunscreen like NIA SUN DAMAGE PREVENTION 100% and high quality moisturizer such as BABOR. AVOID SUNBURNS as they do permanent damage to your skin that doesn't show up until years later as wrinkles and possibly skin cancers.